We have to wonder whether Americans really appreciate the sandwich quite as much as they should. After all, the invention of the sandwich is surely at least as big a milestone in the development of civilisation as the wheel. Yet, while we British show appropriate respect and gratitude to the mighty sandwich with Sandwich Week (which occurred in May), our transatlantic cousins only manage a single Sandwich Day on 3rd November. It really isn't good enough.

As you may have gathered, your humble blogger is something of a sandwich fan. So, it turns out, are my colleagues in the Regtransfers marketing department. A quick straw poll of the team showed no clear consensus on any one superior filling but it did illustrate the versatility of the format. Amongst the nominations from our team were the following: peanut butter and Marmite or cheese and onion from yours truly; ham salad with spring onion; banana toastie; ham, cheese, rocket and wholegrain mustard; cheese and Marmite. Our marketing manager, of course, had to outdo everyone and choose a Vietnamese ham salad banh mi.

What does the public say?

Earlier in the year, bread manufacturer Warburtons polled a sample of 2,000 people to establish British butty trends. Comparing the results to a similar survey conducted in 2018 produces a few surprises as you'll see from the tables below. To this writer's absolute outrage, the marvellous cheese and onion sandwich is nowhere to be seen in the 2020 rankings. Seriously? Is this really what the world has come to?

Some favourites such as sausage, ham and cheese and cheese and pickle stay in the top dozen while others that featured in the 2018 top 30 are nowhere to be seen. As we have seen, cheese and onion is inexcusably absent while turkey salad and jam have also both disappeared.

It may come as a surprise that the increase in vegetarian and vegan diets that has been reported in the media in the last few years does not seem to be reflected in the results of this poll. Both the 2018 and 2020 lists have plenty for the meat-eaters amongst us. A notable, and some might say archaic, appearance in the 2020 chart is the corned beef sandwich. Those of us around in the 1960s and 1970 may well have thought that particular item had faded from the public consciousness but apparently not.

Some components remain popular but the frills with which they are served up have changed. Tuna, for example, remains a strong performer. Tuna and cucumber is present in both tables, as is tuna mayonnaise, but tuna salad has been replaced by tuna and sweetcorn.

We expect you will find plenty to disagree with in these rankings - we certainly did. In fact, although I opened this piece with some tongue in cheek criticism of America, we in the UK must tread carefully: any country that votes egg mayonnaise as its second favourite sandwich should take a long, hard look at itself.

Rank Top 30 2020
1 Bacon
2 Egg mayonnaise
3 Sausage
4 Cheese and pickle
5 Tuna and mayonnaise
6 Ham and cheese
7 Cheese and tomato
8 Chicken and Bacon
9 Chicken and stuffing
10 Egg and cress
11 BLT
12 Fish fingers
13 Prawn salad
14 Tuna and sweetcorn
15 Smoked salmon and cream cheese
16 Ham, cheese and pickle
17 Plain cheese
18 Tuna and cucumber
19 Corned beef
20 Coronation chicken
21 Crisps
22 Ploughman's
23 Ham salad
24 Ham and mustard
25 Brie and bacon
26 Salmon
27 Beef and horseradish
28 Chicken tikka
29 Pulled pork
30 Roast beef salad
Rank Top 30 2018
1 Cheese
2 Ham and cheese
3 Ham salad
4 Sausage
5 Cheese and onion
6 Egg mayonnaise
7 Tuna mayonnaise
8 Chicken salad
9 Chicken mayonnaise
10 Cheese and pickle
11 BLT
12 Chicken and stuffing
13 Cheese and tomato
14 Egg and cress
15 Plain ham
16 Bacon - with ketchup
17 Ploughman's
18 Bacon and sausage
19 Tuna salad
20 Prawn mayonnaise
21 Chicken and bacon
22 Fish finger
23 Ham and mustard
24 Tuna and cucumber
25 Ham, cheese and pickle
26 Bacon - with brown sauce
27 Coronation chicken
28 Turkey salad
29 Jam
30 A christmas sandwich

What's your favourite sandwich? Let us know on Twitter!

See our related article on British Food Fortnight.